Park Quality

Park Quality evaluates how cities are meeting the need for parks based on acreage, facilities and investment, and access. Research shows that there is a positive relationship between better health outcomes and proximity to well-maintained and accessible parks and green spaces. Residents who are spatially proximate to high quality parks report higher physical activity, lower incidence of type 2 diabetes and lower body mass index. Conversely, lack of physical activity is a central risk factor for many diseases. However, park accessibility and quality are not uniform across demographic groups. Low-income neighborhoods, which can potentially benefit the most from parks and green spaces, are less likely to live proximate to quality parks, and when new parks are built near such neighborhoods, they are at increased risk of gentrification. Thus, urban planning around adding and improving parks must be conscious of amplifying the benefits, and balancing potential pitfalls. The Park Quality indicator is derived using methods from “Parkscore®,” a comprehensive rating system developed by the Trust for Public Land, to create a score for parks at the neighborhood level. Data to create the score comes from the U.S. Census, City of Birmingham Capital Budget (FY 2015, ‘16, ‘17) and the parks database, provided by the Freshwater Land Trust.

Neighborhood Indicator Value Ranksort descending
Sun Valley 0 -
Brownsville Heights 0 -
East Lake 74.4 -
Glen Iris 77.4 -
Maple Grove 45.8 -
Redmont Park 90.8 -
Tarpley City 54.2 -
Brummitt Heights 45.8 -
East Thomas 96.3 -
Grasselli Heights 45.8 -
Mason City 94.6 -
Riley 52.6 -
Thomas 63.5 -
Bush Hills 40.6 -
Eastwood 72.9 -
Graymont 92.4 -
North Avondale 73.9 -
Rising - West Princeton 93.8 -
Tuxedo 55 -
Central City 91.5 -
Echo Highlands 48.3 -
Green Acres 82.1 -
North Birmingham 77.6 -
Roebuck 77.5 -
Wahouma 97.5 -
Central Park 81.7 -
Enon Ridge 61.7 -
Harriman Park 61.3 -
North East Lake 85.8 -
Roebuck Springs 76.9 -
West Brownville 62.9 -
Central Pratt 77.5 -
Ensley 77.3 -
Highland Park 73.8 -
North Pratt 70.8 -
Roosevelt 78.8 -
West End Manor 90.4 -
College Hills 56.3 -
Ensley Highlands 74.5 -
Hillman 53.1 -
North Titusville 80.8 -
Sandusky 37.7 -
West Goldwire 58.8 -
Collegeville 74.2 -
Evergreen 56.3 -
Hillman Park 44.8 -
Norwood 94.8 -
Sherman Heights 50.8 -
Smithfield 62.9 -
Woodland Park 67.5 -
Crestline 57 -
Fairmont 53.3 -
Hooper City 60.8 -
Oak Ridge 45.8 -
Smithfield Estates 50.1 -
Acipco-Finley 60.1 -
Woodlawn 55 -
Crestwood North 92.7 -
Fairview 51.9 -
Huffman 59.9 -
Oak Ridge Park 18.1 -
South East Lake 68 -
Airport Highlands 0 -
Wylam 73.3 -
Crestwood South 45.4 -
Five Points South 91.5 -
Industrial Center 61.5 -
Oakwood Place 80.8 -
South Pratt 43.8 -
Apple Valley 0 -
Zion City 48.3 -
Dolomite 64.9 -
Forest Park 93.8 -
Inglenook 49.7 -
Overton 31.7 -
South Titusville 45.6 -
Arlington - West End 89.9 -
Druid Hills 75.9 -
Fountain Heights 93.7 -
Jones Valley 89.6 -
Oxmoor 71.8 -
South Woodlawn 38.1 -
Belview Heights 26.1 -
East Avondale 57.9 -
Garden Highlands 76.3 -
Killough Springs 47.5 -
Penfield Park 31.7 -
Southside 69.6 -
Bridlewood 0 -
East Birmingham 96.9 -
Gate City 62.3 -
Kingston 80.7 -
Pine Knoll Vista 49.2 -
Spring Lake 43.1 -
Brown Springs 65.8 -
East Brownville 67.5 -
Germania Park 77.9 -
Liberty Highlands 30.1 -
Powderly 57.6 -

Key Citations:
1. Auchincloss, A.H., et al. “Neighborhood resources for physical activity and healthy foods and incidence of type 2 diabetes (the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis)” (2009). Archives of Internal Medicine.
2. Cohen, D.A.et al. “Public Parks and Physical Activity Among Adolescent Girls” (2006). Pediatrics.
3. Humphrey, Nancy P. and Carrie I. Szlyk. “Does the Built Environment Influence Physical Activity? Examining the Evidence” (2005). Transportation Research Board, Institute of Medicine of the National Academies.
4. Kahn, E.B. “The effectiveness of interventions to increase physical activity” (2002). American Journal of Preventive Medicine.
5. Roemmich, J.N., et al. “Association of access to parks and recreational facilities with the physical activity of young children” (2006). Preventive Medicine.
6. Voicu, Joan and Vicki Been. “The Effect of Community Gardens on Neighboring Property Values” (2008). Real Estate Economics.